Association Recall Speed

13 posts / 0 new
Last post
#1 11 December, 2012 - 17:27
Offline
Joined: 2 years 7 months ago

Association Recall Speed


To my fellow mnemonists who have been practicing for a long time I am curious as to how much training it took to make recall of some of your pegs/etc relatively instant. How long did it take to make your number, card or any other associations so quick in your mind that it no longer feels like you are putting in much deliberate effort to recall the image associated with 56 for example?

I'm documenting my own progress now just because I find it interesting and I admire people's efforts when they have spend a long period of time day in and day out perfecting a particular skill. It's pretty neat to see.

Anyways, feel free to share some of your best feats and how long it took you to get where you are now!

20 December, 2012 - 23:10
Offline
Joined: 3 months 2 weeks ago

I don't remember how long it took, but one thing that helped with image recognition is to go through my images while I walked to and from work every day. My steps worked like a kind of metronome.

30 December, 2012 - 18:37
Offline
Joined: 2 years 7 months ago

That's interesting. I'll have to try something like that!

31 December, 2012 - 19:04
Offline
Joined: 3 years 4 months ago

I did a similar thing. I would loop through my images in the sauna and on the train to work.

31 December, 2012 - 19:32
Offline
Joined: 3 months 2 weeks ago

Kinma wrote:

I would loop through my images in the sauna...

That's an interesting idea. Did you notice a difference in difficulty while in the high heat?

31 December, 2012 - 20:27
Offline
Joined: 2 years 6 months ago

I'm so new that I don't even have my 00-99 set in stone - but 25 means nail as much as "n-a-i-l" does. Looking forward to when all of the numbers are like that

1 January, 2013 - 01:01
Offline
Joined: 3 years 4 months ago

Josh Cohen wrote:
Kinma wrote:

I would loop through my images in the sauna...

That's an interesting idea. Did you notice a difference in difficulty while in the high heat?

Actually, no. Speed did not seem to decrease while in the heat.
But since there is not a lot of talking in the sauna, I could really concentrate on the difficult images.

1 January, 2013 - 01:16
Offline
Joined: 2 years 7 months ago

Great ideas guys. Right now I'm practicing my 0-99 several times a day just to build up speed. Sometimes I'll practice while laying in bed before I sleep, whenever I can sneak a little practice in. Every little bit seems to help. Once it's a little more automatic I'll practice memorizing random numbers of varying lengths. I bought a great little android app. produced by the memory champs. I forget the name of it but I'm sure some of you have seen it. Anyways it's great for practicing number memorization among other things.

1 January, 2013 - 03:31
Offline
Joined: 3 years 2 months ago

Kinma wrote:
Josh Cohen wrote:
Kinma wrote:

I would loop through my images in the sauna...

That's an interesting idea. Did you notice a difference in difficulty while in the high heat?

Actually, no. Speed did not seem to decrease while in the heat.
But since there is not a lot of talking in the sauna, I could really concentrate on the difficult images.

I have a problem with the heat. In the summer, I cannot train during the day. My results are maybe 30% worse than normal. wait until 20 : 00 at the evening, most of the time, then go out to the garden, and train there. It's also a nice feeling to smell the fresh air of the evening. Even these days, when it's winter here, degrees are below zero all the time, I have to open the window just for a while to get colder air into my bedroom, and then I can train without thinking about the heat...

1 January, 2013 - 05:40
Offline
Joined: 3 years 2 months ago

I used to do exactly that when I was learning all my images - run through the list in my head on the way to and from work. It really helps!

I've always tried to put my finger on whether hot or cold temperature helps or hinders my memory, but I'm never sure whether it does or not. I do like to be hot rather than cold, but I think my memory speed more depends on the mood I'm in...

1 January, 2013 - 06:35
Offline
Joined: 3 years 4 months ago

Btw, TantraMatt.
Don't be afraid to toss images that stay slow.
If an image does not come quickly, maybe another would.

Second tip. For speed I would link the images to the next.
Example.
0 = sea, 1 = hat, 2= hen etc. so I would make up a story that links me from sea to hat to henetc. and run that journey in my mind.

After learning that for a while a couple of words stayed difficult.
I would make up a story with just them and run these in my mind a couple of times a day.
Not only did those images become a lot easier, I got a lot of practice with just my difficult words.
This imho opinion is a great tip for speed. First learn all words and when most of these come to mind quickly pay extra attention to only the difficult ones.

The good thing with journeys is that when you can do them front to back you can easily also do them backwards.
All this helps.

4 January, 2013 - 00:13
Offline
Joined: 2 years 6 months ago

Hi,
this mention of the differences when memorising in the heat or cold is similar to a subject that I have been wondering about.
While a quiet environment is undoubtably an aid when memorising, does anyone specifically train with added distraction eg. radio on, children around, moving vehicles outside the window?
I seem to recall that the (?) Korean archers at the Olympics train at venues where schoolchildren have been specially brought in for the purpose of creating a distraction, the assumption presumably being that if they can cope with added stress in training, then their standard when competing will be higher, or they will at least be in a better position to cope with the unexpected, if it should happen.
I have tried training in the same room as my wife when she watches the TV. I find it hugely distracting, but maybe the more experienced trainer deals with it better?
I notice from photos ( since I have never competed ) that some competitors don headphones to blot out ambient noise.

Just wondered.

Paul

4 January, 2013 - 23:20
Offline
Joined: 3 months 2 weeks ago

oldmanpaul wrote:

While a quiet environment is undoubtably an aid when memorising, does anyone specifically train with added distraction eg. radio on, children around, moving vehicles outside the window?

Johann mentioned that he trains in noisy places.

Learn memory techniques for free! Just click the "Sign up" button below to create an account and we'll send you an email with some tips on how to get started.