Can anyone explain why I remembered these words and names without effort?

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#1 8 February, 2014 - 06:54
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Can anyone explain why I remembered these words and names without effort?


Certain things I have remembered without effort, and I believe if I could understand why I would have access to a good memory technique.
Those living in Britian will know that the personal life of the French president has been in our press recently - as a result I have remembered the names of both women involved immediately without trying or wanting to.
The other more interesting example is that I used to speak Italian and I am now learning Catalan. However recently I watched a cowboy film dubbed in Spanish (which I am not interested in learning) and can remember numerous phrases. Admittely there were strong images but there was no connection made in my head.
The only reason I can think of is that if I hear words in a humourous situation I seem to remember them without effort.
Any explanations would be really helpful.

Thanks - Ian

8 February, 2014 - 07:50
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Probably context. Our brains enjoy humor. Some funny punchline in spanish right before someone shoots someone else is memorable. Our brains also like things that are new or involve danger in some way.

8 February, 2014 - 08:44
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I'm not Ben ^_^

Yea, it helps with memory if things are new, bizarre, funny, dangerous, scary, or pretty much evoke any type of emotion from you.

Bateman

8 February, 2014 - 08:52
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Thanks for your reply Bateman (sorry I said Ben originally). The scenes were humourous: a cowboy shot someone and said "hecho"; in another scene they were in a dirty bar and one said "whisky i mujeres, bali chicos". These phrases I have never forgotten (although I am not sure how to spell them). With the French president the press showed him looking silly, grinning on a scooter, one of the women was shown in a still from a film (in which she was removing her clothes) and the other woman was scowling at the camera. This was obviously the way into my memory.
I should add that our press is quite unsympathetic when it comes to making fun of politicians.

8 February, 2014 - 08:53
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Joined: 3 years 2 months ago

No problem. Welcome to the site, and good luck.

8 February, 2014 - 08:53
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Joined: 2 years 11 months ago

Really sorry Batemen, shows my memory needs improving! Anyway I have corrected it as I hate getting names wrong.

8 February, 2014 - 17:01
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I assume there's some kind of scandal that's being widely broadcast with the French President? Do you think you might have been exposed to those names more times than you were really paying attention to because the stories are everywhere?

9 February, 2014 - 01:57
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Hi LociInTheSky, that is certainly an explanation but I remembered the names almost immediately I read them I think. However Ms. Trierweiler is nicknamed Rottweiler in France, so that is of course, a classic memory technique.
I am learning Catalan and La Infanta Christina (Princess in English) has been in the Catalan news for a long time - including with photographs - because of she is accused of financial fraud and money laundering. I make a point of learning vocaulary from those articles because I have her image in my head while learning the words. Also she evades questions and smiles exactly like someone I had meetings with sometime ago, so that situation and attitude is firmly inprinted on my memory.

9 February, 2014 - 04:21
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LociInTheSky wrote:

I assume there's some kind of scandal that's being widely broadcast with the French President? Do you think you might have been exposed to those names more times than you were really paying attention to because the stories are everywhere?

I have just thought - I read articles in Catalan everyday and with most sites having search facilities I can find many uses of a particular word. If I were to list say six phrases with the new word in it I would learn the word in context and read it several times. Admittedly I would have to learn the meaning initially but it would make me familiar with it. This means I would be reading the words, the same as I was reading the names of the women in the scandal.

(For those outside Britain the scandal can be explained simply as this: the French president lived with one woman while having a secret affair with another - then he said he would decide which woman would be first lady, hence making them hang on. In France they said the president's private life is his private affair and does not affect their opinion of him as president; in Britain they said if he is this dishonest and immoral in his private life, how can he be trusted in his public life.)

13 March, 2014 - 16:24
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Keep thinking. You have good instincts if you are investigating something like this. Not being able to tell the difference between the things that will be remembered and things that will be forgotten is a bane for many people.

You should have been able to remember that phrase fine for a short period, and longer if you were able to rehearse it within that period. Did the story strike you enough to where you might have played it over in your head not long after hearing it? Did you want to remember those words?

14 March, 2014 - 01:25
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Thanks for your reply LociInTheSky. Regarding the names involved in the scandal I did not want to remember them. However the President's affair was discussed continually in the U.K. because various moralistic writers, who condemned British people for their attitudes to women, suddenly admired the President for two-timing and being liberal.

I think you have identified the main problem with my memory techniques. They are good in the short term but I need to look into revision, particularly after a week or so - this could be the missing link for my methods.

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