Novice searching for help!

6 posts / 0 new
Last post
#1 6 August, 2016 - 13:06
Offline
Joined: 6 months 3 weeks ago

Novice searching for help!


Hi.

I just joined this site and I am very eager to learn about mnemonic techniques etc. I have read one book about memory, but there is still a lot that is unclear to me.
For example, I have read about memory palaces and things like that, when there is a chain of info that you want to memorize. But how about when you read about a topic that has nothing to do with anything else that you have learned, how do you go about to memorize that? Do you have a system for that as well?

I hope this question isn't too dumb :/

6 August, 2016 - 22:41
Offline
Joined: 4 years 4 months ago

No question is dumb!

First off, congrats and welcome here. You're about to embark on one of the most amazing journeys ever.

Second, it would be great to know what book you read.

Third, others have their own take, but I believe the Memory Palace is the ultimate foundation for everything. You can use every other memory technique that I've ever discovered inside Memory Palaces, so that's really powerful.

I did a PhD once upon a time and read oodles of books. This infographic and podcast teach you what I did with index cards and Memory Palaces to memorize all the essential info:

I would do it a little bit different these days, but not much.

Alex Mullen had a cool post here on the site along related lines with some good comments you should check out too. It's about double-encoding info:

http://mt.artofmemory.com/blogs/alexm/when-using-memory-palaces-should-i...

Hope this helps.

In the meantime, create lots of Memory Palaces, experiment a lot and ask questions. It's going to be awesome! :)

7 August, 2016 - 13:37
Offline
Joined: 6 months 3 weeks ago

Okey, thanks for the reply!
I read the book "Unlimited Memory" by Kevin Horsley. I found it to be a good book, but not detailed and extensive enough.
And regarding loci; say my desk in my room is a locus, would that then be a symbol for something else, or should I imagine something happening on/under/over the table, so the table is just the "scene of the crime"?

7 August, 2016 - 13:37
Offline
Joined: 6 months 3 weeks ago

Okey, thanks for the reply!
I read the book "Unlimited Memory" by Kevin Horsley. I found it to be a good book, but not detailed and extensive enough.
And regarding loci; say my desk in my room is a locus, would that then be a symbol for something else, or should I imagine something happening on/under/over the table, so the table is just the "scene of the crime"?

8 August, 2016 - 02:16
Offline
Joined: 4 years 4 months ago

Horsley's book is awesome. I reviewed it here.

I don't think there's a memory book on the planet that covers it all. I always tell people that "one is a dangerous number" when it comes to studying mnemonics. Read as much as you can, as often as you can.

I just ordered a whole pile of books and am loving every page because there's just no end to the angles people bring to this art. :)

11 August, 2016 - 16:16
Offline
Joined: 6 months 3 weeks ago

Quote:

But how about when you read about a topic that has nothing to do with anything else that you have learned, how do you go about to memorize that?

Mnemonic associations don't need to have much in common with the material you're trying to learn. They just have to remind you of the answer.

For example, I just hopped over to wikipedia to find a random fact in their "Did you know that..." section:

... that Julián Nazar Morales has served on ranching commissions in each of his four terms in the Mexican Chamber of Deputies?

This fact is pretty much outside anything I've studied before.

I might imagine Julian Basheer from Star Trek Deep Space Nine (Julian) with nose lasers (Nazar) drinking more and more ales (Morales) and eating hot-wings with ranch sauce (ranching) and boasting about the 'commissions' he's earned from his fraudulent real-estate deals in Mexico. All of a sudden, four Mexican Deputies show up and lock him in a chamber pot (Mexican Chamber of Deputies).

Another example: 'King Philip Came Over From Germany Seeking Sustinance' is a mnemonic for remembering 'Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus, Species, Species epithet'.... but the mnemonic device has nothing to do with the content.

Learn memory techniques for free! Just click the "Sign up" button below to create an account and we'll send you an email with some tips on how to get started.

Related content: